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We caught up with Ambrose and asked them for an update following the release of “Curtains.”

Have to start by asking, each of you, how are doing personally?

We’re pretty good. We’ve been starting our mornings with “Someday” by Sugar Ray followed by a hearty bowl of honey bunches of oats.

How do you feel the response has been to “Curtains,” which you previously said was vastly different than your previous single?

The response has been great! Our monthly listeners on Spotify have increased significantly and a lot of people seem to be excited about our revamped sound. We’re really excited to see how everyone reacts to the rest of our EP, Vigor.

Read that the band is using Minds.com, an open-source and decentralized social networking platform, after Waxamilion’s post convinced you. How can fans connect to you through it?

You can find us on minds.com at @ambroseprog, or by clicking here.

Fans who signed up for your email list were able to hear the new single first. What else can they expect by email?

Expect to be able to hear the whole EP early, find out about merch and be able to order ahead-of-time, and be able to influence factors of our set and digital media that regular fans aren’t able to!

Looking ahead — what’s being planned for 2019?

Right now, we are focusing on releasing Vigor and working on an EP release show. Ambrose merch will be available soon and we are looking forward to playing more shows, maybe a tour, and recording our second album later this year.

Original Feature:

Ambrose is taking Nashville by storm. Created in the fall of 2016, the band mixes the sounds of both metal and rock to create what they like to call, Nashville Prog. All five members of Ambrose migrated separately from Northeastern America to attend Belmont University, which is where their story begins. Three of them met freshmen year, which is followed by their recording of “7twelve”. By 2017, the band had grown to its full capacity. Each member adds to the full bodied, multiplex sound that makes Ambrose what it is today.

“This song, Curtains, is going to grab you by the chest and throw you down the stairs. You aren’t ready. Truly.” Read the entire band post on their new music here Ambrose blog.

Listen to “Curtains”

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Who or what drew each of you to the music industry?

Luke: Like most of the boys, I’ve played different instruments in a couple different ensembles growing up (jazz, orchestral, metal) and we’ve never made the option of doing anything other than music available for ourselves because of the love we have for our instruments.

Dave: From a very young age, I wanted to be a rock star. I realized around 12 years old just how unlikely it would be that I would be a famous musician and then decided to focus my energy on a career in the music business instead. Now that I am actively pursuing a degree in music business, I have started to come back around to wanting to be a career musician, ironically, and I am excited to use the knowledge I gain every day to help further this band.

Ben: I grew up listening to a lot of 80’s metal bands which originally inspired me to pick up a guitar. Eventually, I became addicted to practicing and playing guitar every day. This helped establish a general love for playing music with other people. This drive and passion for music keeps me engaged into the industry.

Drew: From about 5 years old, I listened to my parents favorite artists, which mostly consisted of Bon Jovi and Bruce Springsteen (being the born and bred New Jersey folk we are). My dad eventually brought home his old Pearl drum set from when he was in high school, and I haven’t stopped playing drums since.

Brock: Since a young age I’ve been drawn to music, as my parents are inclined to stage performance and other arts. Music has an underlying adhesive through all humans; the mystery of its existence and the sheer vastness of it inspire me to create and to contribute to the songs in my life. Despite the many practical horrors of entertainment industries, I aspire to bring progressive and experimental reform: to luminate [sic] the wondrous, under appreciated potential of this ancient art.

What is the most appealing thing about pursuing a music career?

Being a progressive band gives us a lot of freedom to create what we want rather than what falls in a respective genre’s “guidelines.” I think we’re all most excited to see how people react to our music. Since our upcoming release is vastly different from our previous one, we are extremely curious to see where we fit in and how our music is received by people who currently listen to us and people who have never heard of us before.

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How did you all meet?

Drew, Luke, and Ben all met in a Facebook group for accepted Belmont Students and befriended each other because of a shared music taste, meanwhile, Luke and Dave met on the same Facebook page for different reasons. Luke’s Philadelphia based metalcore band, The Second Phase, wanted to go on tour that summer, and Dave’s booking company at the time booked the tour for them. After touring together, Dave and Luke became good friends, and upon arriving at Belmont, Luke connected Dave with Drew and Ben, who both conveniently lived down the hall. A few months later, they met Brock through mutual friends and immediately grew very close to him. Now, two years later, the five of us live together in the same house.

Ambrose — how did you choose the band’s name?

We were originally called “done.” before we had written any music but after our first couple of songs were finished, we decided that the current band name didn’t fit our sound. One day we were all listing potential band names and somebody mentioned “Ambrosia” which we shortened to Ambrose. The Latin translation of Ambrose is “Immortal One” which we just found out today!

Which artists from the 1960s have influenced your band the most?

We would say the most influential artist to us that comes out of the 60s is John Coltrane. We take a lot of influence from his innovations in modal modulation especially from his album Giant Steps.

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What are the characteristics of great music?

Great music is any music that makes you feel strong emotion. Anything that can change your mood, whether it be happy to sad, or content to angry.

What albums would you recommend to fans new to the genre?

Everyone seems to enjoy Chon in one way or another so definitely listen to Grow by Chon. Also, you need to listen to Incensored by our pal Waxamilion. He’s a phenomenal guitarist and producer and has a feature section on our soon to be released single “Curtains” which will drop on March 1st.

What’s your song writing process?

Usually Luke composes and structures the songs with his guitar part, drums, and bass and occasional additional guitar parts on a guitar tablature program after writing it out on his guitar. Ben and Brock will then write their own parts based on the structure mapped out in the program. Drew usually comes in last and spices up the drum parts to his liking.

How would you describe the evolution of the band’s sound?

We consider our first record Adama as a trial run for us. At the time we were writing the album, there was never an established style. We just thought that we wanted to play math rock. So, we just threw a bunch of ideas together in the hopes of discovering a couple of defining characters that we could emphasize on in future releases. From our previous release to our upcoming release, our style has evolved into a more energetic, focused, and impactful sound.

How does technology impact your music?

Technology impacts our music heavily. For starters, the entirety of Adama was recorded on Dave’s laptop and then transferred wirelessly to our producers to mix and master it, who then once again transferred it wirelessly across the world to Dave (who was in Prague at the time) to finally release it exclusively online to streaming and download services. Additionally, Brock spent countless hours hunting through public domain sound-clips looking for good content to sample (as you can hear all throughout the record, but most notably on “Lance” and “Xu”).

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What has been your biggest challenge as a band?

Our biggest challenge has probably been finding the time we need to do everything we want as a band. We all genuinely want to make it with Ambrose, but between full time college for most of us and work, it has been very hard to make everything we want to do happen, but working as hard as we do, we make it happen.

Where do you see your Nashville Prog music moving forward with your new release?

We are going to become more hard-hitting, energetic, and off the walls with every coming release, starting next Friday with “Curtains”. From this next EP to beyond, we will be delivering music that will push us beyond our limits as instrumentalists. You’ll be hearing a lot more technicality, and a lot more groove.

What advice would you have for someone wanting to follow in your footsteps?

The biggest advice we can give is don’t go to college, or at least don’t go to a traditional 4-year university. This has been far and away the biggest obstacle in our path as a band, and we all believe we could be much further had we not gone to college. That being said, none of us would have met if it weren’t for a 4-year college.

How do you balance your music with other obligations?

It is definitely not an easy task. With most of us being in college and working, we don’t have as much time as we wish when it comes to practicing our instruments and creating music. However, all of us find time in our schedules to work on what we need to everyday. We all have collectively worked our schedules out so we can practice together and spend time talking about band decisions and social media. Managing our time is still an ongoing challenge for us, but, we are all figuring out the best way to go about being our most productive selves.

What do you wish people would ask you in an interview?

How we’re doing personally. We have feelings too, you know!

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